How to capture your child’s firsts on a mobile phone, according to a baby photographer

Whether you’re busy snapping away on your phone or you’d rather let a photographer capture your baby’s first years, many parents find themselves taking more pictures than they used to when they’ve got children.

After all, these are precious moments that you won’t get back.

During the coronavirus pandemic, getting out and about with your baby – or during pregnancy – can be tricky and many mums-to-be have had to cancel pregnancy photoshoots. And not everyone has a high-tech camera at their disposal.

Photographer Suzi Bird explains how it is possible to expertly capture a baby’s firsts on your mobile phone.

Read more: Lauren Pope shares go-to 10-minute pregnancy workout

As part of Yahoo UK’s parenting video series The Baby Bump with Lauren Pope, the photographer starts by giving parents-to-be some tips on how to capture nice maternity photos.

She recommends starting by finding a nice airy space

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A baby sleep routine in first 12 weeks is ‘pointless’, says expert

Sleep – or lack thereof – is a very common topic when it comes to parenting.

Simply put, babies and toddlers don’t sleep like us. There’s science behind the way they sleep compared to adults and the term “body clock”, which many of us will be familiar with, is not something babies possess in the first 12 weeks.

“We all sleep in cycles, nobody sleeps all night,” parenting author and sleep expert, Sarah Ockwell-Smith, explains, “for adults, we go through cycles every 90-120 minutes.”

According to Ockwell-Smith, we go into a light sleep (which is when you’re most likely to jolt awake because you fell over in your dream), from there your sleep gets deeper and deeper until about half way through the cycle.

Babies don’t follow the same cycle, and understanding that is the first step to helping your baby sleep well.

Read more: Pregnancy experts share top tips

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Harry and Meghan book lifts lid on bitter split with family

London (AFP) – Prince Harry and wife Meghan blamed “viper” courtiers for widening their rift with the royal family, according to extracts from a new book published in The Times on Saturday.

The couple say they did not contribute to the new biography “Finding Freedom”, written by journalists Omid Scobie and Carolyn Durand, but friends of the couple provided much of its content.

The book, serialised in The Times, will claim that Harry felt “unprotected” by his family, and lay bare his split from brother William and his wife Kate.

Kate even refused to make eye contact with her sister-in-law at their final engagement in March, according to the new release.

Harry apparently referred to senior courtiers as “vipers” who felt that the global popularity of the couple was overshadowing the family and “needed to be reined in”, according to extracts.

Related video: The British Royal Family

The book, to

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You Might Not Be a Tween, But You Should Watch ‘The Baby-Sitters Club’ Anyway.

Photo credit: Kailey Schwerman/Netflix
Photo credit: Kailey Schwerman/Netflix

From Esquire

Through these agonizing months of quarantine, I, like so many others, have watched a record amount of television. Yet somehow, even the best of it has failed to hold my attention, with each episode sliding unremarkably by—just as the grim, interminable days do. I began to fear that my TV-glutted brain was forever broken, but just when I thought all was lost, a show for tweens brought me back to life: Netflix’s bright, big-hearted reboot of The Baby-Sitters Club.

For the uninitiated, The Baby-Sitters Club is adapted from the wildly popular series of middle-grade novels by Ann M. Martin, begun in 1986, which spanned over 200 volumes by the time publication ceased in 2000. In the first book, Kristy’s Great Idea, twelve-year-old Kristy Thomas is inspired to team up with her friends to form a club of local babysitters; in the

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